Trump highlights Staub Manufacturing Solutions at SOTU

Trump highlights Staub Manufacturing Solutions at SOTU

Jan 31, 2018

  Featured on Fox News   President shares company’s story during address and invites members to the White House.     Watch the latest video at...

Primed for Another Year of Growth

Primed for Another Year of Growth

Jan 23, 2018

By Neil Dutta, Bloomberg  The global economy is a big driver, but domestic demand is even more important. U.S. manufacturing production just had its best year since 2011, yet some argue that 2017 was as good as it will get and that a slowdown is ahead. We think the opposite is more likely: Factory output is poised to speed up. Investors worried that the equity market is stretched should take heart. Stronger growth in factory output is a good reason to remain cyclically oriented, especially in U.S. industrial stocks. Trade, one of the biggest engines of the sector in 2017, is likely to continue to gather momentum. Stronger global growth expectations and a weaker dollar should help as manufacturing goods represent about half of all exports. Moreover, at least some of the current recovery in factories can be traced to the rebound in the mining industry. Mining output declined steadily from December 2014 to September 2016. Production was down 0.6 percent during this period, when there was also a sharp pullback in oil and drilling equipment. Today, we are seeing the opposite dynamic. With commodity markets in recovery, mining-related investment is more of a tailwind to factories. While the global economy is a big driver of manufacturing growth, U.S. domestic demand is even more important. Every 1 percentage point increase in domestic demand (GDP net of trade) boosts manufacturing production by 1.34 percentage point on an annualized basis, while every 1 percentage point increase in global industrial production outside the U.S. lifts domestic manufacturing production by 0.44 percentage point. There are several positive, somewhat related signs for the manufacturing outlook in the domestic economy. First, U.S. inventory investment is simply too low. Although the contribution of inventories to growth can be volatile from quarter to quarter, inventories tend to grow in line with final sales over longer periods of time. Today, that simply is not happening; inventories have been trailing the growth in domestic demand. If the economy expands at 2.2 percent, the rough trend since the end of the recession, inventories would need to grow by about $50 billion per year to keep pace with demand. Inventories ran below that level in 2017....

Apple announces plans to repatriate billions in overseas cash…

Apple announces plans to repatriate billions in overseas cash…

Jan 19, 2018

“Apple announces plans to repatriate billions in overseas cash, says it will contribute $350 billion to the US economy over the next 5 years” By Anita Balakrishnan, CNBC Apple on Wednesday made a slew of announcements about its investment in and contribution to the U.S. economy in part because of the new tax law. The headline from Apple is that it will make a $350 billion “contribution” to the U.S. economy. The company also promised to create 20,000 new jobs and open a new campus. It said it expects to pay about $38 billion in taxes for the horde of cash it plans to bring back to the United States. This implies it will repatriate virtually all of its $250 billion in overseas cash. Apple also said it will spend over $30 billion in capital expenditures over the next five years. About $10 billion in capital expenditures will be investments in U.S. data centers, the company said. Apple added that it will spend $5 billion as part of an innovation fund, up from the $1 billion CEO Tim Cook announced last year on CNBC’s “Mad Money.” The job creation will include direct employment and also suppliers and its app business, which it had already planned to grow substantially (app developers earned $26.5 billion in 2017.) The new campus will focus on customer support. Wednesday’s announcement indicates that Apple will still have hundreds of billions of dollars in cash. It could spend that money on buybacks, dividends or acquisitions or moonshot projects. The announcement raises the bar for the world’s most valuable company — now a huge driver of the economy — to continue its dominance and growth in the wake of political pressure on big tech companies. The plan calls for Apple to keep up 2018’s $55 billion “supercycle” spending rate with domestic suppliers and manufacturers. “We have a deep sense of responsibility to give back to our country and the people who help make our success possible,” Cook said in a statement. Apple to create 20,000 jobs over the next 5 years from CNBC. In 2016, then president-elect Donald Trump publicly called out Apple’s reliance on its Chinese supply chain, telling The New York...

The State Of Manufacturing Reshoring Today

The State Of Manufacturing Reshoring Today

Jan 17, 2018

By Team Thomas of ThomasNet.com Over the past several years, many U.S. manufacturers have moved operations offshore in order to reduce labor costs and bring jobs closer to their raw material sources. Although this can be an efficient way of increasing profits, it does come with its drawbacks — more complex supply chains, delivery issues, culture and language barriers, and long distances to operations, to name a few, making it hard to keep track of jobs and quickly address issues as they arise. For these and other reasons, reshoring — bringing operations back to U.S. shores — is becoming increasingly common among manufacturing and industrial companies. A Look At Reshoring by the Numbers Over the last half-dozen years or so, manufacturing reshoring has brought hundreds of thousands of jobs back to U.S. soil. The Reshoring Initiative, a nonprofit organization that aims to bring well-paying manufacturing jobs back to the U.S., took a look at where those jobs are coming from and how the industry is benefitting as a result in their Reshoring Initiative 2016 Data Report.  According to the report, the transportation equipment sector, in particular, has seen the lion’s share of this growth with the addition of nearly 134,000 jobs. More than 35,000 jobs have been added in the electrical equipment, appliances, and components sector. Plastic and rubber products, fabricated metal products, computer and electronic products, apparel and textiles, chemicals, and machinery sectors have also brought jobs back to the United States, with each sector accounting for thousands of new positions. Source: Reshoring Initiative 2016 Data Report So where are these jobs coming from, and where are they going? The following countries saw the most jobs being brought back to American soil: China (nearly 80,000 jobs), Germany (over 54,000 jobs), Japan (over 35,000 jobs), and Mexico (over 19,000 jobs). Jobs are also pouring back in from Canada, Switzerland, Korea, Spain, the United Kingdom, and Denmark. Source: Reshoring Initiative 2016 Data Report Nearly all U.S. states are seeing job growth due to reshoring efforts, but those with the greatest influx are South Carolina (over 51,000 jobs), Tennessee (over 36,000 jobs), and Georgia (nearly 24,000 jobs). Source: Reshoring Initiative 2016 Data Report The Factors Fueling Reshoring But why now? There...

US Manufacturing Adds 25,000 Jobs in December

US Manufacturing Adds 25,000 Jobs in December

Jan 9, 2018

By Bill Koenig, AdvancedManufacturing.org US manufacturing added 25,000 jobs in December, primarily in durable goods. Makers of durable goods boosted payrolls by 21,000 jobs, according to a breakdown by industry sector released today by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Jobs gains were widespread throughout durable goods. Major gainers included machinery (up 6000 jobs) and fabricated metal products (up 5400). The only durable goods category posting a job loss was furniture, down 700. The December results capped off a year that saw manufacturing employment expand by 196,000 jobs, of which 130,000 was in durable goods industries. Manufacturing lost 16,000 jobs in 2016, the bureau said in a statement. In 2015 and 2016, aerospace and the auto industry were the strongest job performers in manufacturing. During 2017, other industries picked up the pace of job generation. Manufacturing totaled 12.539 million jobs on a seasonally adjusted basis in December. That’s up from 12.514 million in November and 12.343 million in December 2016. Total Jobs Total non-farm employment increased by 148,000 jobs last month, the bureau said in the statement. That was less than the 190,000 median estimate of economists surveyed by Bloomberg. The US unemployment rate remained unchanged at 4.1%, the bureau said. Manufacturing jobs peaked in June 1979 (19.6 million on a seasonally adjusted basis, 19.7 million unadjusted). That sank to a low of 11.45 million adjusted and 11.34 million unadjusted in February 2010 following a severe recession caused by the 2008 financial crisis. Since that low, new manufacturing jobs have been created requiring increased skills because of increased automation and technology in...