New Design Could Spur Proliferation of LiDAR Sensors for…

New Design Could Spur Proliferation of LiDAR Sensors for…

Mar 21, 2017

“New Design Could Spur Proliferation of LiDAR Sensors for Autonomous Vehicles” By Design-2-Part Magazine MORGAN HILL, Calif.— Velodyne LiDAR Inc., a prominent developer of light, detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology, has developed a design for a solid-state LiDAR sensor that reportedly makes the sensors less expensive, easier to integrate due to their smaller size, and more reliable as a result of fewer moving parts. The design, which can be integrated in Velodyne LiDAR’s existing Puck form factors, is reported to yield a subsystem cost of under $50 U.S. when sold in high-volume manufacturing scale. Velodyne LiDAR (www.velodynelidar.com) is optimistic that the technology will spur proliferation of LiDAR sensors in multiple industry sectors, including autonomous vehicles, ridesharing, 3D mapping, and drones. “Our new design approach creates a true solid-state LiDAR sensor, while significantly raising the bar as to what can be expected from LiDAR sensors as far as cost, size, and reliability,” said David Hall, founder and CEO of Velodyne LiDAR, in a company release. “Together with our customers and partners, we strive to create a world where LiDAR sensors increase safety and freedom for people everywhere, and this new design is a huge step in that direction.” Velodyne LiDAR’s new approach to the development of solid-state LiDAR sensors reflects the application of a monolithic gallium nitride (GaN) integrated circuit, developed in partnership with Efficient Power Conversion (EPC). The design consolidates components and is said to result in significant advances in sensor miniaturization, reliability, and cost reduction. At less than 4mm square, each integrated circuit is of a size that “just covers George Washington’s nose on the U.S. quarter,” according to Velodyne LiDAR.   “As LiDAR technology continues to gain widespread adoption, GaN technology brings higher performance, resulting in higher image resolution, all while offering enhanced integration of key functions that ultimately lead to reduced overall cost for LiDAR-based system solutions,” said Dr. Alex Lidow, CEO and co-founder of Efficient Power Conversion Corporation, in the release. Velodyne LiDAR’s design is currently being tested and integrated into future products. The company expects to announce a release date sometime in 2017. “Velodyne’s decades of LiDAR expertise places it in the best position to define and develop power-...

Factory moves from China to U.S. with help from robot…

Factory moves from China to U.S. with help from robot…

Feb 23, 2017

  “Factory moves from China to U.S. with help from robot workforce”   Automation has contributed to the declining U.S. manufacturing workforce. But as Mark Strassmann reports, now technology may help factories move back to the U.S.  ...

How A 10-Minute Conversation With A Machine Saved…

How A 10-Minute Conversation With A Machine Saved…

Jan 20, 2017

“How A 10-Minute Conversation With A Machine Saved $12 Million” By Colin Paris, Manufacturing.net A call comes through on my tablet. It’s a familiar digital voice letting me know that one of GE’s power generation turbines installed at a utility customer’s power plant was experiencing a change in its operating profile. This change was causing a critical part to wear more rapidly than usual. It would not necessarily cause a problem today, explains the caller, or even in the coming months. But further down the line, it could become an issue that would reduce the overall performance of the power plant and lead to more expensive repairs. That voice on the other end of the line is not a human operator. It is the turbine’s Digital Twin, an exact digital replica of the physical machine built with artificial intelligence algorithms that allow it to see, think and act just like human beings do. In my ten- minute conversation with this Digital Twin, we figure out a solution that would save $12 million for the customer with a simple adjustment in how the turbine operates. The drop-off in performance and higher repair costs will be avoided thanks to a few simple changes the Twin itself recommended based on its assessment of historical data, other turbines in this fleet, and its deep knowledge of the physical stress on the turbine in question. The Internet ushered in the world of connectedness on a level no one had previously imagined. Today, that connectedness has spread from human-to-human, to human-to-machine, to machine-to-machine, and we’ve given it a new name – the Internet of Things. We see the IoT in the home, when we talk to Amazon Echo’s Alexa or to Google and ask them for information or to perform a simple task. To understand those questions and requests, Alexa uses a dictionary that is gained from Wikipedia – and its capabilities are developing quickly, since much of the digital infrastructure of the consumer IoT is already in place. The industrial IoT is developing even quicker, despite exponentially higher technological and regulatory complexities. Industrial devices – like a power generation turbine, a jet engine, a locomotive, or an MRI machine...

Robot Would Assemble Modular Telescope — In Space

Robot Would Assemble Modular Telescope — In Space

Jan 12, 2017

By Design-2-Part Magazine  BELLINGHAM, Wash.—Enhancing astronomers’ ability to peer ever more deeply into the cosmos may hinge on developing larger space-based telescopes. A new concept in space telescope design makes use of a modular structure and an assembly robot to build an extremely large telescope in space, performing tasks in which astronaut fatigue would be a problem. The robotically assembled modular space telescope (RAMST) design is described by Nicolas Lee and his colleagues at the California Institute of Technology and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in an article published in July by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, in the Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems (JATIS). Ground-based telescopes are limited by atmospheric effects and by their fixed location on the Earth. Space-based telescopes do not have those disadvantages, but have other limits, such as overall launch vehicle volume and mass capacity. Design of a modular space telescope that overcomes restrictions on volume and mass could allow telescope components to be launched incrementally, enabling the design and deployment of extremely large space telescopes. The design detailed by Lee and his colleagues in “Architecture for in-space robotic assembly of a modular space telescope,” focuses primarily on a robotic system to perform tasks in which astronaut fatigue would be a problem. “Our goal is to address the principal technical challenges associated with such an architecture, so that future concept studies addressing a particular science driver can consider robotically assembled telescopes in their trade space,” the authors wrote. The main features of the authors’ proposed architecture include a mirror built with a modular structure, a robot to put the telescope together and provide ongoing servicing, and advanced metrology technologies to support the assembly and operation of the telescope. An optional feature is the potential ability to fly the unassembled components of the telescope in formation. The system architecture is scalable to a variety of telescope sizes and would not be limited to particular optical designs. “The capability to assemble a modular space telescope has other potential applications,” said Harley Thronson, senior scientist for Advanced Astrophysics Concepts at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, in a press release. “For example, astronomers using major ground-based telescopes are accustomed...

Why so many U.S. manufacturers are putting up…

Why so many U.S. manufacturers are putting up…

Dec 21, 2016

“Why so many U.S. manufacturers are putting up ‘Help Wanted’ signs” By Danielle Paquette, The Washington Post Susan Murray Carlock says her Indiana company is providing something popular opinion has deemed nearly extinct: well-paying manufacturing jobs. Over the past four years, Mursix Corp., a creator of seat belt buckles and bed frames, has sought to fill a variety of production positions. The average wages exceed $20 an hour — a ladder to the middle class. Trouble is, she can’t find workers. “We’ve been on a growth trajectory that is crazy,” said Carlock, whose family bought the firm for roughly $5 million in 1990 and has watched it grow into a $42 million business. “But we face serious labor force issues.” The company needs skilled laborers, men and women who can absorb the “tribal knowledge” of the toolmakers before they retire, she said. This year, in an effort to draw talent, the firm set up an apprenticeship, paying promising employees as they learn the trade. Carlock’s predicament isn’t isolated, even in the Rust Belt, where steadily vanishing manufacturing jobs became central to this year’s presidential election. She knows of at least two other plants in Muncie, Ind., a college town in the state’s northeast quadrant, that face a similar hiring challenge. “We’re all competing with each other for people,” she said. “To say manufacturing is dying in the United States just isn’t true.” But American manufacturing is changing, and the enterprises flourishing today often demand a different set of skills than assembly lines of the past. One reason for the labor shortage is the fear of change, said Michael Hicks, a business professor at Ball State University in Muncie, Carlock’s city. Many of the open roles involve computer assistance, which requires job training. Although some companies and state programs will cover the tuition bills, some workers, particularly those who’ve held the same job for decades, are hesitant to take them up on the offer, even if unemployment is imminent and the wages are competitive. The average hourly wage for these roles is approximately $20, according to federal data. “I’ve gone to war,” said Hicks, an army veteran turned academic, “and going back to school was scarier.” Young people aren’t helping fill the slots...