The New American Reshoring Movement By the Numbers

The New American Reshoring Movement By the Numbers

Jul 26, 2017

By Cutting Tool Engineering Magazine Many people are under the impression that manufacturing jobs are only moving in one direction: offshore. While many corporations are shifting certain jobs overseas to reduce manufacturing costs, there’s a lot more to the story. In reality, there are many businesses that have been making strenuous efforts to bring jobs back to the United States, a phenomenon known as the reshoring movement. Want to learn more about reshoring in the United States? Keep reading to see which U.S. companies have brought the most jobs back to the states, plus more information on this important new movement.     Companies reshore jobs in part due to increasing foreign labor costs, but that’s just one reason. Simply put, as automation and tools for engineering have improved, so too has the complexity of the manufacturing industry. And many specialty manufacturing jobs can’t be easily sent overseas. Contrary to popular belief, improvements in automation technology and engineering tools have been major assets to the new American economy. While some manufacturing jobs have been lost in recent decades, the productivity of the U.S. manufacturing sector has actually increased substantially. That means American companies are producing more goods for less cost, which results in better prices for consumers and better wages for workers. Even so, companies in the manufacturing industry are making continual efforts to bring jobs back into the United States. Often, these new manufacturing jobs and the latest tools for engineering require advanced education and highly technical skills that only American workers have to...

U.S. Reshored Jobs Rising — But What Will 2017 Bring?

U.S. Reshored Jobs Rising — But What Will 2017 Bring?

Jun 2, 2017

By Taras Berezowsky, Metal Miner Looks like the tide has finally turned. Extending that metaphor is easier now than it’s ever been for us writing on this topic: the reshoring of American manufacturing from abroad — and specifically, the net gains in jobs that we’ve been seeing in 2016 and early 2017 as compared with the trends in the early 2000s. (I envision the emigrating jobs huddled together for warmth on a seaworthy vessel, with Shanghai getting smaller in the distance as the Pacific waves toss the boat ever closer toward Long Beach… if only it were that poetic.) Back to reality. The Reshoring Initiative has just released its 2016 Data Report, and the numbers seem to tell a rosy story. According to the report press release, “in comparison to 2000-2003, when the United States lost, net, about 220,000 manufacturing jobs per year to offshoring, 2016 achieved a net gain of 27,000.” “The numbers demonstrate that reshoring and FDI are important contributing factors to the country’s rebounding manufacturing sector,” the release concluded. But of course, it’s not that easy. Major policy changes will have to be made or improved to continue the reshoring trend (which is still in its early stages), according to Harry Moser, founder of the Reshoring Initiative. In a way, the U.S. should aspire to host conditions like those in Germany, Moser told me, including a supportive government, VAT, low healthcare costs, and an appreciation of the benefit of local sourcing. “Germany has a huge trade surplus and manufacturing at about 20% of employment,” Moser said, “and [the U.S. has] a huge trade deficit and manufacturing at about 10%.” RELATED: We chatted with Moser in a video interview a few years ago when the latest results within the trend were gaining steam (below). The Good News for U.S. Metals Jobs According to the full report, in 2016, fabricated metals had a good showing with the fourth-most reshored jobs by industry category. Also, primary metals moved ahead of non-metallic minerals: Good to see that toys and hobbies industry jobs are coming back… but not nearly as quickly. The “Good/Bad/Who Knows” News for U.S. Metals Jobs One aspect of our new economy that’s...

America’s Manufacturing Renaissance

America’s Manufacturing Renaissance

May 8, 2017

By Craig Guillot, Global Trade Magazine Already On The Upswing Before The Election, American Industry Readies For A “Trump Bump” American manufacturing is in the midst of a renaissance. While the sector has been riding a wave of automation, increased efficiencies and changing macroeconomic forces, manufactures say the Trump administration could help fuel further growth with a reduction in regulations and new tax incentives. Economic development commissions (EDCs) across the country say manufacturing is thriving with new expansions and investments being driven by local tax incentives, access to quality talent, and a value proposition making it increasingly cost-effective to produce products in the United States. On a national scale, support for innovative technologies, workforce development, and a pro-business environment have the potential to drive American manufacturing to new levels. Growth in many subsectors and regions The manufacturing sector is experiencing robust growth across the country. Major manufacturers such as Ford, GM, and Carrier have announced new investments, while the Labor Department revealed the country added 28,000 manufacturing jobs in February. National Association of Manufacturers President and CEO Jay Thomas attributes the surge to a “Trump bump” of positive economic activity and says that “confidence is high, and business optimism continues to soar” due to a focus on pro-business policies. President Trump said in late -January that he wants to cut regulations by 75 percent and that there will “be advantages” for manufacturers to operate in the United States. American manufacturing has been growing on an impressive scale. NAM reports the top five states for manufacturing growth are Indiana, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa and Alabama. Greg Canfield, Secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, says the sector remains a “core strength” of the state’s economy, generating 17 percent of state GDP ($35 billion) and 13 percent of the state’s jobs. Canfield notes that Alabama exported a new annual record of manufactured goods in 2016, totaling $10.7 billion in shipments. “Alabama’s manufacturing climate has been thriving in the past few years, with steady gains in employment, rising productivity, and increasing sophistication among manufacturers,” said Canfield. He adds that while there has been a sharp decline in apparel, textile and steel manufacturing due to offshoring and automation, automobile...

GM to Invest $1 Billion in U.S. Manufacturing Operations

GM to Invest $1 Billion in U.S. Manufacturing Operations

Apr 24, 2017

By Design-2-Part Magazine DETROIT—General Motors (GM) will invest an additional $1 billion in U.S. manufacturing operations that include multiple new vehicle, advanced technology, and component projects, the company announced recently. Details of individual projects will be announced throughout the year, GM said in a press release. The company also announced it will begin work on insourcing axle production for its next generation full-size pickup trucks, including work previously done in Mexico, to operations in Michigan, creating 450 U.S. jobs. “As the U.S. manufacturing base increases its competitiveness, we are able to further increase our investment, resulting in more jobs for America and better results for our owners,” said GM Chairman and CEO Mary Barra, in the release. “The U.S. is our home market and we are committed to growth that is good for our employees, dealers, and suppliers and supports our continued effort to drive shareholder value.” GM’s announcement is part of the company’s increased focus on overall efficiency over the last four years. With a strategy to streamline and simplify its operations and grow its business, GM reports that it has created 25,000 jobs in the U.S.—approximately 19,000 engineering, IT, and professional jobs and 6,000 hourly manufacturing jobs—and added nearly $3 billion in annual wages and benefits to the U.S. economy over that period. At the same time, GM reports that it has reduced more than 15,000 positions outside the U.S., bringing most of those jobs to America. During that period, the company says, it has moved from having outsourced 90 percent of its IT work outside the U.S., to an insourced U.S.-based model. “We will continue our commitment to driving a more efficient business,” said Barra, “as shown by our insourcing of more than 6,000 IT jobs that were formerly outside the U.S., streamlining our engineering operations from seven to three, with the core engineering center being in Warren, Michigan, and building on our momentum at GM Financial and in advanced technologies. These moves, and others, are expected to result in more than 5,000 new jobs in the U.S. over the next few years.” General Motors (www.gm.com) has also been facilitating its supplier base to do the same. The company has been executing...

The long, rough ride ahead for ‘Made in America’

The long, rough ride ahead for ‘Made in America’

Apr 17, 2017

By Nick Carey, Reuters Mini motorcycle and go-kart maker Monster Moto made a big bet on U.S. manufacturing by moving assembly to this Louisiana town in 2016 from China. But it will be a long ride before it can stamp its products “Made in USA.” The loss of nearly one out four U.S. factories in the last two decades means parts for its bike frames and engines must be purchased in China, where the manufacturing supply chain moved years ago. “There’s just no way to source parts in America right now,” said Monster Moto Chief Executive Alex Keechle during a tour of the company’s assembly plant. “But by planting the flag here, we believe suppliers will follow.” Monster Moto’s experience is an example of the obstacles American companies face as they, along with President Donald Trump, try to rebuild American manufacturing. U.S. automakers and their suppliers, for example, have already invested billions in plants abroad and would face an expensive and time-consuming transition to buy thousands of American-made parts if President Trump’s proposed “border tax” on imported goods were to become law. When companies reshore assembly to U.S. soil – in Monster Moto’s case that took two years to find a location and negotiate support from local and state officials – they are betting their demand will create a local supply chain that currently does not exist. For now, finding U.S.-based suppliers “remains one of the top challenges across our supplier base,” said Cindi Marsiglio, Wal-Mart Stores Inc’s (WMT.N) vice president for U.S. manufacturing and sourcing. Wal-Mart partnered with Monster Moto and several other U.S. companies in a drive to increase spending on American-made goods by $250 billion by 2023 in response to consumer demand for American-made goods. Their experience has shown Americans’ patriotic shopping habits have limits, namely when it comes to price. Take Monster Moto’s bikes, which sell for between $249 to $749. Keechle, the CEO, says he can’t raise those prices for fear his price sensitive prospective customers will turn to less expensive rivals made in China. “Consumers won’t give you a free pass just because you put ‘Made in USA’ on the box,” Keechle says. “You have to remain price...