Michelin’s concept tire comes wrapped in “rechargeable”…

Michelin’s concept tire comes wrapped in “rechargeable”…

Jun 16, 2017

“Michelin’s concept tire comes wrapped in “rechargeable” 3D-printed treads” By  Aaron Heinrich, New Atlas Aside from trotting out a new tread pattern every year or so, you might think there’s not a lot manufacturers could do to improve the humble car tire. But advances in materials, sensors and manufacturing techniques are opening up new possibilities. Michelin is exploring this potential with its Vision concept tire that is airless, 3D printed, equipped with sensors, biodegradable, and not just a tire, but a tire and wheel in one.   Unveiled at a global symposium on urban mobility challenges it hosted this week in Montreal, Canada, Michelin’s Vision tire is constructed using 3D printing technology. This enables an airless interior architecture that mimics alveolar structures (such as the air sacs of the lungs) that is solid in the center and more flexible on the outside, resulting in a tire that is immune to blowouts or going flat. The core of the tire, which also functions as a wheel and can be reused, would be made from organic materials that are bio-sourced and biodegradable. 3D printing allows the amount of rubber tread applied on the outside of the tire to be optimized to meet the specific needs of the driver while keeping the amount of rubber required to a minimum – and the tread can even be topped up, or “recharged,” when it wears down or the driver is headed for different road conditions. Although the Vision’s tread would still be made mostly of rubber, Michelin is envisioning the day when materials such as straw or wood chips could be used to make butadiene, a key ingredient in making synthetic rubber today. The condition of the tires would also be monitored in real time using embedded sensors. The owner would receive information about the tire’s condition and possibly use an accompanying app to make an appointment to change the tread for a particular use, like going skiing. Michelin isn’t saying when any of these innovations will be implemented, let alone when the Vision might be available for purchase, but Mostapha El-Oulhani, the designer who headed the Vision Project, said the promise of the concept tire is within reach....

Manufacturing Jobs Outsourced to Space

Manufacturing Jobs Outsourced to Space

Jun 8, 2017

By Industrial Equipment News How it’s becoming cheaper and more efficient to manufacture 250 miles above the earth. Although it’s somewhat open for debate, the International Space Station is currently scheduled for retirement somewhere between 2024 and 2028. Shortly thereafter, Houston-based Axiom has big plans for the real estate it currently occupies. The firm’s overall plans for space are pretty aggressive, including an extension for the Space Station to accommodate tourists as soon as 2020. When the ISS runs its course, this module would be self-sufficient and open to expanded use for research and manufacturing. The company feels that by 2027 the ability to offer contract manufacturing, or at least lease the available space at their new outpost for production, will be a leading revenue source for the company. Axiom feels this will be made possible by advancements in 3D printing that would allow for manufacturing products like jet turbines, solar panels, satellites and optical fiber. There are two primary reasons for Axiom’s enthusiasm. First, costs for producing space station-like hubs are down nearly 90 percent since the ISS was made in 1998. This makes manufacturing in the microgravity environment of space, which is ideal for maintaining cleanroom-like conditions, more affordable to more countries and more companies. Lower-cost real estate in space also means specialized operations like repairing and deploying small satellites will be subject to greater competition because it could be done at a fraction of the current cost. Additionally, Axiom is looking to partner with California-based Made In Space, which built the 3D printers currently onboard the Space Station. Made In Space also developed the Archinaut – an advanced 3D printer with robotic assembly arms. Archinaut would allow for manufacturing larger pieces of equipment, as well as integrating electrical components. Combining these capabilities means supports for large telescopes, parts for spacecraft and other larger and more complex equipment could be made in space, instead of relying on spacecraft transport. This type of space-based manufacturing tech removes additional cost and takes the size of the spacecraft and its payload limitations completely out of the equation. There would essentially be no size limits when looking at what can be built in...

Robots & Us: The Future of Work in the Age of AI

Robots & Us: The Future of Work in the Age of AI

May 30, 2017

By Wired Robot co-workers and artificial intelligence assistants are becoming more common in the workplace. Could they edge human employees out? What then? Check out video: https://www.wired.com/video/2017/05/robots-us-the-future-of-work-in-the-age-of-ai/ ...

Manufacturer Offers Design Tips for Custom Springs

Manufacturer Offers Design Tips for Custom Springs

May 25, 2017

By Mark Shortt, Design-2-Part Magazine It’s not easy to make a custom spring a reality—that is, to complete the transformation from an idea or concept to a tangible, finished part. Recognizing this, Ritch Froelich set out to help designers understand some of the key considerations required to engineer a custom spring. Froelich is general manager and chief design engineer at Ace Wire Spring & Form Company, Inc., an ISO certified and ITAR registered manufacturer of custom compression springs, extension springs, torsion springs, and wire forms for diverse applications. He wrote a guide, “Proper Requirements of Spring Design,” which Ace Wire Spring has made available to spring designers. The guide covers important factors that designers should consider, for example, when selecting the right material or establishing tolerances for specific applications. Material selection, Froelich said, begins by considering the environment in which the custom spring will perform. Temperature is a key part of that equation. If the part needs to function in temperatures exceeding 650 degrees Fahrenheit, a high-temperature material, such as Inconel, should be specified. “Whereas, if the design requires the spring to work in an ambient temperature environment, perhaps a less costly material, such as oil tempered (spring wire), can be introduced,” Froelich wrote. Another key consideration is whether or not the spring will come into contact with any form of moisture or chemicals, such as chlorine or bleach, according to Froelich. If the part will be used in an outdoor environment that includes exposure to salt water, most professional spring designers would start with T-316 stainless steel, he noted.  “Though there are other, more costly materials on the market, T-316 stainless is highly used in these applications,” he wrote. “If the spring were simply subjected to a high-moisture source, such as tap water, conceivably, a design using T-302 can be implemented.” Other key factors to be considered are cycle life—the amount of cycles that the spring will encounter over its service life—and exactly where the spring will be installed in the application. “If the designer is engineering a spring that works in an engine, and the spring were to be cycled several million times over its lifetime, a material such as chrome silicon...

Why Tesla Could Become the Next Apple

Why Tesla Could Become the Next Apple

May 23, 2017

By Mohanbir Sawhney, Fortune Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s bold prediction that his $53 billion company could one day be as valuable as Apple the most valuable company in the world with an $800 billion market cap, is based on his logic that Tesla will disrupt manufacturing with automation by going after the “machine that makes the machine.” While it may seem just pie in the sky, there is a case for Tesla to become the next Apple. Tesla is betting that it can create a fully automated manufacturing process that will be as revolutionary as Henry Ford’s continuous assembly line. Ford revolutionized manufacturing in 1913 by creating a process that broke the assembly of the Ford Model T into 84 distinct steps as the car moved down the line on a conveyer belt. The process revolutionized production and dropped the assembly time for a single vehicle from 12 hours to 90 minutes. Ford was able to reduce the cost of the Model T from $850 to $300 and produce a car every 24 seconds. Ford ended up selling 15 million Model T cars by 1927, and the continuous assembly line remains the foundation of automobile manufacturing to this day. Although automation with robots has dramatically improved the efficiency of automotive manufacturing, the final assembly is still a manual process.   Tesla aims to combine its capabilities in advanced software and artificial intelligence (AI) with advanced automated manufacturing capabilities it acquired in November 2016 by buying Grohmann Automation to create a factory that will produce very high volumes at much lower costs than today’s auto factories. A fascinating insight from Tesla’s blog: The “factory becomes more of a product than the product itself.” Tesla believes that it can usher in the next manufacturing revolution by dramatically increasing production volumes and reducing labor costs in manufacturing. So why won’t other auto manufacturers follow suit and overtake Tesla? First, their products, as well as their factories, are bogged down by legacy. Tesla’s electric cars are significantly easier to manufacture than internal combustion (IC) vehicles. Tesla’s Model S has fewer than 20 moving parts, compared with almost 1,500 moving parts in an IC-engine car. This means that there are...