Apple is reportedly trying to move iPhone manufacturing to…

Apple is reportedly trying to move iPhone manufacturing to…

Nov 21, 2016

“Apple is reportedly trying to move iPhone manufacturing to the US”  By James Bareham, The Verge Apple is reportedly asking its manufacturing partners to investigate moving iPhone production to the United States, according to the Japanese newspaper Nikkei. According to the report, sources claim that Apple has approached Foxconn and Pegatron, the two manufacturing companies that are largely responsible for assembling iPhones. Foxconn is apparently exploring the possibility, while Pegatron has elected to decline due to cost concerns. According to the Nikkei, Apple made the request to explore moving manufacturing to its partners in June, prior to President-elect Donald Trump’s victory in the recent election. But despite that, this report has to be considered in light of Trump’s comments regarding Apple earlier this year. Trump has repeatedly suggested that Apple move its manufacturing back to the US. His most recent comments were made in January at a talk at Liberty University where Trump said, “We’re gonna get Apple to start building their damn computers and things in this country, instead of in other countries.” Moving iPhone production overseas would likely be a pricey endeavor, with Nikkei sources claiming that it would increase production costs by nearly 50 percent, which makes sense given that the vast majority of Apple’s part suppliers are already located in Asia. Motorola also tried to move smartphone manufacturing to America, but the experiment ended in 2014 when Motorola closed the factory due to costs. Apple has made some efforts in bringing hardware production back to America in the past — most notably, the Mac Pro in 2013, when the company invested over $100 million dollars to jumpstart production — but relocating iPhone manufacturing to the United States would be a move of a vastly different...

New App Turns Apple iOS Devices into Professional Vibration…

New App Turns Apple iOS Devices into Professional Vibration…

Nov 11, 2016

“New App Turns Apple iOS Devices into Professional Vibration Measurement Tools” Featured in Design-2-Part Magazine FARMINGTON HILLS, Mich.—ACE Controls, a specialist in industrial damping technology, has introduced a new app that is said to turn iPhones and iPads into professional vibration and impact measuring devices, providing users with a high-performance, lightweight alternative to more costly systems. ACE’s VibroChecker PRO native iOS app is an upgraded version of its original VibroChecker app, which uses the acceleration sensors, gyroscopes, and microphones integrated in the iPhone and iPad to measure vibrations on machines and components within a frequency range of up to 50 Hz. Upgrading to the new ‘PRO’ version of the app increases the range up to 8,000Hz. The user simply has to connect an external USB sensor (available from a third party) to the iOS device via the lightning port and an adaptor. Measurement results can be saved or emailed directly to Ace Controls. The app is available for download here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/vibrochecker-pro/id1076108553?mt=8&ign-...

Apple Targets Electric-Car Shipping Date for 2019

Apple Targets Electric-Car Shipping Date for 2019

Sep 23, 2015

By Daisuke Wakabayashi, Wall Street Journal Consumer-electronics maker accelerates efforts to build Apple-branded car Apple Inc. is accelerating efforts to build an electric car, designating it internally as a “committed project” and setting a target ship date for 2019, according to people familiar with the matter. The go-ahead came after the company spent more than a year investigating the feasibility of an Apple-branded car, including meetings with two groups of government officials in California. Leaders of the project, code-named Titan , have been given permission to triple the 600-person team, the people familiar with the matter said. Apple has hired experts in driverless cars, but the people familiar with Apple’s plans said the Cupertino, Calif., company doesn’t currently plan to make its first electric vehicle fully autonomous. That capability is part of the product’s long-term plans, the people familiar with the matter said. Apple’s commitment is a sign that the company sees an opportunity to become a player in the automotive industry by applying expertise that it has honed in developing iPhones—in areas such as batteries, sensors and hardware-software integration—to the next generation of cars. An Apple spokesman declined to comment. There are many unanswered questions about Apple’s automotive foray. It isn’t clear whether Apple has a manufacturing partner to become the car equivalent of Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., the Taiwanese contract manufacturer that builds most iPhones and is known by the trade name Foxconn. Most major auto makers build and run their own factories, but that hasn’t been Apple’s strategy with iPhones or iPads. Contract manufacturing in the auto industry usually is limited to a few niche models. The 2019 target is ambitious. Building a car is a complex endeavor, even more so for a company without any experience. Once Apple completes its designs and prototypes, a vehicle would still need to undergo a litany of tests before it could clear regulatory hurdles. In Apple’s parlance, a “ship date” doesn’t necessarily mean the date that customers receive a new product; it can also mean the date that engineers sign off on the product’s main features. It isn’t uncommon for a project of this size and complexity to miss ship-date deadlines. People familiar with the project said there is skepticism...

Apple Patents New Liquidmetal Techniques For Manufacturing

Apple Patents New Liquidmetal Techniques For Manufacturing

Aug 20, 2015

By John Biggs, TechCrunch Liquidmetal, as you’ll recall, is a bulk metallic glass – BMG – that can be cast into shapes and then hardens into a metal. It’s popular in watchmaking and was recently taken up by Apple in their iPhone manufacturing process. Today’s patent, however, addresses the process of casting multiple metals or BMGs, allowing manufacturers to surround alloys in other alloys. Patent No. 9,103,009 is a “method of using core shell pre-alloy structure to make alloys in a controlled manner.” This means you can cast objects consisting of multiple metallic layers including metal over BMG, BMG over metal, and an alloy of both. By cooling the material at proper rates you reduce the opportunity for crystals to form inside the metal, thereby ruining the object. Clearly this esoteric patent isn’t aimed at the average consumer – yet – but it could mean some interesting designs for phones and wearables down the road. The company holds the exclusive license to the technology and should be implementing it in more hardware in the...

A lot of people are optimistic about the Apple Car…

A lot of people are optimistic about the Apple Car…

Feb 18, 2015

“A lot of people are optimistic about the Apple Car, but for all the wrong reasons” By Steve Kovach, Business Insider There hasn’t been this much hype about a nonexistent Apple product since Steve Jobs was quoted in his official biography as saying he had finally “cracked” TV. It was the line that kicked off a thousand blog posts: When is the Apple television coming? What will it be able to do? What will it look like? Analysts like Piper Jaffray’s Gene Munster assured us the Apple television was imminent.  That was over three years ago, and Apple has yet to launch a television or even an updated version of the Apple TV box. Starting last Friday and through the long weekend, all anyone in the industry could talk about were the various reports that Apple is working on a top-secret car project. The Wall Street Journal said the car will be an Apple-branded electric vehicle that currently resembles a minivan. (A minivan?) Reuters reported Apple is working self-driving technology. The Financial Times reported Apple has a secret research lab filled with automotive experts trying to work on new products for cars. And an Apple employee emailed Business Insider to say the company’s working on something that will “give Tesla a run for its money.” Within a few days, there was so much smoke about Apple’s secret ambitions for the car that there has to be fire. But as neat as it sounds, there are some who are overly optimistic about Apple’s ability to turn cars into its next major business. A Cantor Fitzgerald analyst implied that Apple’s car could be the company’s next iPhone. Silicon Valley entrepreneur and investor Keith Rabois thinks Apple will be able to turn cars, which are modestly profitable, into something that’s suddenly and magically able to mint profits. All of those thoughts are wildly optimistic. As Business Insider’s Jay Yarow wrote a few years ago, the iPhone is a once-in-a-lifetime megahit. I’ll probably be an old dude or dead before someone comes up with a product that fundamentally changes the way people live and interact with each other. For all the talk and criticism about Apple “needing” to find its next big thing, Apple has proven that it can do...