Meet the Giant Robot That Builds Boeing’s Airplane Wings

Meet the Giant Robot That Builds Boeing’s Airplane Wings

Oct 24, 2016

By Wired Building something as large as a 737 wing takes an even bigger machine. Boeing’s Panel Assembly Line (PAL) is the 60 ton, 20 feet tall, friendly robot that always lends a rather large hand.      ...

Stratasys launches two new 3D printers, partners with Boeing…

Stratasys launches two new 3D printers, partners with Boeing…

Sep 21, 2016

“Stratasys launches two new 3D printers, partners with Boeing and Ford on applications” By Alison DeNisco, TechRepublic Two new 3D printers from Stratasys could revolutionize aerospace and automobile manufacturing, the company announced Wednesday. The machines represent the next step in large-scale 3D printing for manufacturing, which experts say will completely change the field in the next decade. The Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator and the Robotic Composite 3D Demonstrator expand the company’s Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technology across manufacturing to more efficiently build bigger, stronger, higher-quality parts. Stratasys also partnered with Boeing to define the requirements and specifications for the Infinite-Build to meet their needs for customized flight parts. Ford Motor Company is also exploring the machine’s abilities for car manufacturing, Stratasys announced. Both the aerospace and automobile industries face pressure to continue to innovate and evolve—not only in performance, but in time to market, said Scott Sevcik, director of manufacturing platform development at Stratasys. Industry leaders are considering how to gain a competitive edge by offering a more differentiated passenger experience, whether in flight or on the road. “These industries are looking strongly toward 3D printing as a critical enabler to meet those needs going forward,” Sevcik said. “It offers the freedom of design, to be able to create parts that you could not make before with traditional processes.” The new machines further Stratasys’ efforts in large-scale manufacturing with 3D printing. In June, the company announced a partnership with Toyota division Daihatsu, offering 10 different 3D printed designs and patterns that owners can customize for the Copen two-door convertible. While 3D printing has been used on a small scale for race car parts in the past, these projects represent the industry’s first move into more mainstream auto manufacturing. Rise of 3D printing manufacturing The adoption of industrial 3D printing continues to grow, with global spending on printers reaching nearly $11 billion in 2015. Spending is predicted to rise to about $27 billion by 2019, according toInternational Data Corporation. About two-thirds of US manufacturers are currently adopting 3D printing in some way, an April PricewaterhouseCoopers report found—roughly the same number as did in 2014. However, 51% are using it for prototyping and final products, compared to...

Getting ready for smart manufacturing within the…

Getting ready for smart manufacturing within the…

Jul 25, 2016

“Getting ready for smart manufacturing within the aerospace industry” By Paul Simon, Managing Director, ConsultEP Airbus and Boeing are pushing their supply chain to heroic efforts by ramping up production rates, whilst driving cost down, on existing and new aircrafts. This huge industrial challenge already has caused delays due to the numerous backward-looking supply chain management approaches being used: Wiring problems delayed the Airbus A380 supper-jumbo; Outsourcing snared Boeing’s 787 long-haul aircraft; Software bedevilled the Airbus A400M military transporter; Software glitches and slow engine start associated with P&W engine set back the deliveries of A320neos; Deliveries of A350 were impeded by late arrivals of lavatories and business seats from Zodiac Aerospace factories in the US. As a consequence, the aerospace industry has began the race to achieve a dramatic improvement in cost efficiency and operational effectiveness by implementing Industrial 4.0 / Smart factories. Since the Industrial Revolution, there have been five distinct waves of innovation, called Kondratieff waves, each of which began with disruptive new technologies and ended with global depression. The 4th and 5th waves, corresponding to the 3rd Industrial Revolution from 1970 to 2010, brought the explosion in machine technologies in our factories. In 1975, for the first time, we introduced computer technology on the shop floor in the form of Numerically Controlled (NC) equipment. Even before this technology was widespread, in 1980, we launched the next generation, Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) and Direct Numerically Controlled (DNC) equipments, which were interlinked and controlled from a single computer. By 1985, we started using Flexible Manufacturing Systems (FMS), which are capable of handling small lot production and rapidly changing product design. We are now on the cusp of the 4th Indutrial Revolution, which corresponds to the sixth Kondratieff wave. Within the aerospace industry, innovations in new composite material technology, Additive Manufacturing technology, Cyber-Physical systems, Internet Of Things and Internet Systems are coalescing into a smart manufacturing platform that will deliver vast superior cost efficiencies and better operational effectiveness. These smart manufacturing platforms allow the visualisation of the entire production network and allow individual equipment to make decisions on its own. In the automotive industry, which was early adopters, they are capable of handling a...

Boeing shows off capabilities of new 787-9

Boeing shows off capabilities of new 787-9

Jul 13, 2016

By Michael Cruickshank, The Manufacturer US aircraft manufacturer Boeing has this week shown off the aerobatic capabilities of its recently released 787-9 jet. This large passenger jet is one the most high-tech passenger aircraft in the world, and Boeing is keen to show off its prowess. Throughout a newly-released video, the 787-9 is filmed conducting a number of aerobatic moves which push the aircraft above and beyond its standard operating conditions. One of the more spectacular of these manoeuvres is a near-vertical take off, more reminiscent of a military fighter plane, than a commercial wide-body craft. In addition, the aircraft is seen conducting a touch-and-go landing, a critical ability in an emergency situation. Finally, Boeing also demonstrated the 787-9’s ability to conduct high-banking turns that show ‘wing flex’. The aircraft in the video was flown by 3 Boeing test pilots: Capt. Van Chaney, Capt. John Misuradze, and Capt. Randy Neville. The flights themselves were conducted on an ANA (All Nippon Airlines) 787-9, the first launch customer for the aircraft series. Following the video, the same aircraft will be flown between July 11 and 13 at the Farnborough International Airshow in Farnborough in the UK. 787 development continues This primary purpose of this video was for Boeing to show off the latest model of its 787 jet which is currently in production. While earlier 787 designs already made use of carbon fiber construction, larger windows, and lower-altitude pressurization, the 787-9 features a number of significant changes. These include a longer and stronger fuselage able to typically seat around 280 people, and an increased flying range of 14,140 km on a full tank of fuel. Right now over one hundred 787-9 aircraft have been delivered by Boeing, with the company claiming to have received so-far 571 orders by 38 customers worldwide for these planes. The continuing advancement of this aircraft and its strong sales figures, show that Boeing has seen success in pushing past some of the teething problems associated with the 787, most of which were linked to faulty...

These 3 Industries Are Getting Transformed By Advanced…

These 3 Industries Are Getting Transformed By Advanced…

May 10, 2016

“These 3 Industries Are Getting Transformed By Advanced Manufacturing” By Grayson Brulte, Manufacturing.net Imagine a world of full of machines manufacturing anything we desire on-demand, where robots attend to workers’ every need. Welcome to the future of advanced manufacturing — a hybrid of technologies and processes that manufactures goods through the use of innovative technologies. Today, advanced manufacturing accounts for 13 percent of jobs in the U.S. and contributes $3.1 trillion to the economy. As machines become smarter through adaptive sensor networks connected to the Industrial Internet, efficiencies will be created and the economic impact will only grow. Advanced manufacturing techniques combined with big data analytics will allow companies to make intelligent decisions based on real-time data. This actionable data will lead to faster turnaround times for manufacturing and lower costs. Here are three industries that are among the biggest beneficiaries of advanced manufacturing:   1. Electric Vehicles As society changes, consumer habits change. Last year, we saw an unprecedented demand for electric cars, as electric vehicle sales grew by 60 percent worldwide according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. As the race for the sub-$30,000 electric car heats up, Tesla is using advanced manufacturing robots at its Fremont plant to keep up with demand. Tesla’s robots are relieving workers of the most labor-intensive operations in the factory and cutting installation times in half. By freeing up workers to focus on the most crucial aspects of assembling a vehicle, Tesla is creating a smarter, leaner workforce. By 2040, 35 percent of all new cars sold worldwide are expected have a plug and long-range electric cars will start at less than $22,000. To keep up with the projected demand, electric vehicle manufacturers will have to openly embrace the marriage of software and hardware that is advanced manufacturing. 2. Robotics Robots might not yet be part of everyone’s daily lives, but soon they will be part of the everyday workforce. Sales of industrial robots sold grew by 8 percent worldwide last year, according to the International Federation of Robotics, surpassing 240,000 units sold for the first time. As industrial robot sales grow, The Boston Consulting Group predicts that a “robotic revolution” is poised to transform many industries...