Stratasys launches two new 3D printers, partners with Boeing…

Stratasys launches two new 3D printers, partners with Boeing…

Sep 21, 2016

“Stratasys launches two new 3D printers, partners with Boeing and Ford on applications” By Alison DeNisco, TechRepublic Two new 3D printers from Stratasys could revolutionize aerospace and automobile manufacturing, the company announced Wednesday. The machines represent the next step in large-scale 3D printing for manufacturing, which experts say will completely change the field in the next decade. The Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator and the Robotic Composite 3D Demonstrator expand the company’s Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technology across manufacturing to more efficiently build bigger, stronger, higher-quality parts. Stratasys also partnered with Boeing to define the requirements and specifications for the Infinite-Build to meet their needs for customized flight parts. Ford Motor Company is also exploring the machine’s abilities for car manufacturing, Stratasys announced. Both the aerospace and automobile industries face pressure to continue to innovate and evolve—not only in performance, but in time to market, said Scott Sevcik, director of manufacturing platform development at Stratasys. Industry leaders are considering how to gain a competitive edge by offering a more differentiated passenger experience, whether in flight or on the road. “These industries are looking strongly toward 3D printing as a critical enabler to meet those needs going forward,” Sevcik said. “It offers the freedom of design, to be able to create parts that you could not make before with traditional processes.” The new machines further Stratasys’ efforts in large-scale manufacturing with 3D printing. In June, the company announced a partnership with Toyota division Daihatsu, offering 10 different 3D printed designs and patterns that owners can customize for the Copen two-door convertible. While 3D printing has been used on a small scale for race car parts in the past, these projects represent the industry’s first move into more mainstream auto manufacturing. Rise of 3D printing manufacturing The adoption of industrial 3D printing continues to grow, with global spending on printers reaching nearly $11 billion in 2015. Spending is predicted to rise to about $27 billion by 2019, according toInternational Data Corporation. About two-thirds of US manufacturers are currently adopting 3D printing in some way, an April PricewaterhouseCoopers report found—roughly the same number as did in 2014. However, 51% are using it for prototyping and final products, compared to...

HP and Jabil: A 3D printing partnership to revolutionize…

HP and Jabil: A 3D printing partnership to revolutionize…

Sep 2, 2016

“HP and Jabil: A 3D printing partnership to revolutionize manufacturing” Stephen Nigro, President 3D Printing HP Although you might not immediately recognize the name, Jabil Circuit Inc. is one of the largest and most operationally advanced design and manufacturing solution companies in the world. You probably use office electronics or carry a smartphone that was designed, manufactured and/or assembled by Jabil for one of its many brand-name customers. And, as a top Jabil executive told a crowd of over 80 industry analysts last week at the HP Industry Analyst Summit in Boston, they’re extremely excited to be among the first users of the HP Jet Fusion 3D Printing Solution, the world’s first production-ready 3D printing system. “We’ve been a partner with HP on a variety of manufacturing fronts for many years,” John Dulchinos, Jabil’s Vice President and General Manager of Global Automation and 3D Printing, told me on stage at IAS. “We have tremendous respect for HP’s innovation, technical prowess, and ability to deliver solutions. So when we first heard HP was coming to market with a 3D printer,” he said, “they kind of had us at hello.” The feeling is mutual. It’s fantastic working with Jabil. They’re a lot like HP, with strong corporate social responsibility values, a world-class supply chain, a great culture of innovation, and a clear vision of the future. Jabil has already adopted 3D printing in its quest to make factories that are more responsive, more flexible, and more adaptive to its customers’ needs. So, I asked John, why is Jabil so excited about our introduction of the HP Jet Fusion 3D printers and processing stations? I wanted the analysts who cover HP to hear his answers, of course, but I also want to share his enthusiasm with everyone who wasn’t in Boston. “Only HP’s Jet Fusion 3D printers offer the speed, quality, cost efficiencies and open innovation platform needed to disrupt a $12 trillion manufacturing industry in the next decade,” John stated. “When we look at other 3D solutions on the market today,” John said, “they’re not viable at scale, and not viable to be able to take products to market.” He cited HP’s three decades of expertise in inkjet printing, precision mechanics, materials...

Five Ways 3D Printing May Improve Your Life

Five Ways 3D Printing May Improve Your Life

Aug 18, 2016

By David Mantey, Industrial Equipment News These applications could improve, and even extend, our lives. The medical industry has only scratched the surface when it comes to 3D printing applications. Now, bioengineers are looking at the future, and in a special issue of Trends in Biotechnology, researchers came up with five ways that 3D printing might improve and quite possibly extend our lives.     1. Made-to-Order Organs-on-a-Chip Organs-on-a-chip are 3D microengineered systems that mimic human tissue. Researchers have already grown tissue on chips using human stem cells, but 3D printing could reduce the labor and costs necessary to build, seed, and meet the demand for chips. 2. Skin Manufacturing Printed skin has already been made by placing cells on a collagen gel, but skin bioprinting, or manufacturing, is on the horizon. Researchers are now considering the designs that are necessary to help patients, especially those with burns or chronic wounds. 3. Facial Reconstruction Bone, cartilage and muscle have already been printed in a lab, but constructing more complex designs that can be implanted in patients is still in development. Craniofascial reconstruction, for people who have cancer or facial injuries, is an obvious candidate. That’s right rebuilding faces. But we’re close, as we’re already using 3D-printed scaffolds for facial reconstruction. 4. Multi-Organ Drug Screens Creating man-made organs, or “organoids,” to evaluate how new drugs would interact with the organs. 5. Plug-in Blood Vessels Finally, we have 3D blood vessel networks within bioengineered tissues, which are particularly important, because it not only means keeping the tissue alive as its being printed, but also making sure it survives after it’s inside...

Building A 3D-Printed Rocket Engine

Building A 3D-Printed Rocket Engine

Aug 8, 2016

By Kaylie Duffy, Product Design & Development, Manufacturing.net NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, has pioneered space exploration and rocket advancements since it was established in 1960. Serving as one of the space agency’s largest centers, MSFC was responsible for various components of crucial missions, such as developing the Saturn launch vehicles for the Apollo moon program and leading the development of Space Shuttle propulsion elements and its external tank. Currently, Marshall is pursuing another potentially groundbreaking technology for spaceflight: additive manufacturing, otherwise known as 3D printing. The center’s exploration into 3D printing began in June 2011 when a team of MSFC engineers conducted the first hot fire test of a 3D printed part – a hot gas duct for the gas generator of the J-2X rocket engine. “That was the first time we were able to test a 3D printed part in a hot fire environment,” explains Nick Case, Marshall’s engine analysis team lead. “You can do analysis, material testing, and an individual component test, but it’s very hard to replicate the true environment of a hot fire rocket engine test.” After successfully testing the duct, the Marshall engineers moved on from the J-2X rocket engine to developing a smaller engine more compatible with the build box of available 3D printers. They designed a 35,000-pound liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen upper stage engine. However, the engineers wanted to apply as much 3D printing to the project as possible to prove the technology could be a whole-system solution – not just for piece parts. Since the second project began about three years ago, the team has designed, developed, and tested a 3D printed fuel turbopump that spins at 91,000 revolutions per minute (rpm), while producing 2,000 horsepower (hp). Additionally, they’ve designed, printed, and tested a main injector, control valves, speed lines, tubing, and piping. “We’ve 3D printed and tested just about every piece of the rocket engine that we’ve designed,” says Case. “And we’ve been very successful in our approach.”   Finding the Right Vendors When Marshall first started 3D printing rocket engine parts, there were only a few vendors in the country that had the necessary equipment and know-how...

Additive Manufacturing: The State of the Industry

Additive Manufacturing: The State of the Industry

Jul 27, 2016

By Terry Wohlers, President, Wohlers Assoicates Inc. , Tim Caffrey, Manufacturing Engineering This article includes highlights from Wohlers Report 2016, the 21st annual worldwide progress report on the 3D printing and additive manufacturing state of the industry. Additive manufacturing (AM) and 3D printing, terms used interchangeably, are alive and well. Organizations around the world, including many national governments, are investing substantial resources into the development of the technology and its adoption. An impressive number of new companies and businesses are developing AM products and services in ways the industry has not seen in the past. New machines and materials are becoming available at a breakneck pace. Novel applications and other advances suggest a future that will bridge AM’s prototyping past to a production future. This is stimulating countless organizations worldwide to explore ways in which they can become a part of this fast-growing and exciting industry. Those who have invested in some of the publicly traded stocks may be less than thrilled about the current state of the industry. Indeed, some of the changes in share prices over the past two years have not been pretty. Some have been downright ugly. Do not let low stock values fool you. When looking at almost everything else associated with AM, it is not difficult to become ecstatic about where it’s headed.   Investments Abound Many organizations worldwide are betting, some big, with their pocketbooks. For example, it was announced early last year that $259 million would be spent to create the Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation, a public–private partnership project aimed at developing East Tennessee into an AM hub. The Department of Energy has committed $70 million, and the remainder is coming from a consortium of 122 companies and universities. In September 2015, Alcoa announced that it would spend $60 million to expand an R&D center to include the development of AM methods and materials. The following month, the state of New York said it would invest $125 million in a 3D printing facility that would operate as a public–private partnership. Norsk Titanium of Norway is its primary partner. In January 2016, Stryker announced that it would spend nearly $400 million to build a facility for the...