AI-Based Software Aimed at Simplifying 3D Printing of Metals

AI-Based Software Aimed at Simplifying 3D Printing of Metals

Feb 17, 2017

By Elizabeth Montalbano, DesignNews A new toolkit that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to help advance the 3D printing of metals by managing and simplifying steps of what is currently a complex process.  Sculpteo Software , a French software provider, recently unveiled Agile Metal Technology (AMT) at the CES show in Las Vegas. The suite of six tools aim to help take the complexity out of 3D metal printing by adding automation, management, and optimization to the 3D metal printing process.  Using metals in an additive manufacturing process allows for the creation of fully functioning parts with high mechanical properties that may otherwise be impossible to develop with traditional manufacturing techniques, said Sculpteo Marketing Content Manager Hannah Bensoussan in a blog post . To be sure, while 3D printing of metals is currently possible, it’s not easy, and it’s still fairly expensive due to the necessary use of complex procedures, she said. One of those procedures often includes the need to make multiple versions of single parts before coming up with a final product, which is time consuming and expensive.  Making it easier to use 3D printing to fabricate in materials beyond plastic is the next milestone for this type of manufacturing to make it more widely accessible. That’s in part the reasoning behind the development of the AMT suite, said Sculpteo CEO Clement Moreau.  “Metal 3D printing offers the possibility of building new parts with complex geometries that are not possible with traditional methods; however getting metal additive manufacturing right is a serious challenge,” he said. “As the complexity of additive manufacturing grows, it is difficult to get the necessary information to make the project go smoothly. Experts and specific software exist, but they are extremely expensive, and add to production time.”  Sculpteo already has made the first tool in the online suite—Business Case—available, with the others currently in development and will follow later. Business Case is a “self-learning artificial intelligence” that can analyze the feasibility of a metal additive manufacturing project, calculate risks and opportunities, and provide advice in the case that there is a better material or technique to fit the project’s needs, according to Bensoussan’s post. The tool is available online.  Forthcoming tools in...

5 Emerging Technology Trends for Manufacturers in 2017

5 Emerging Technology Trends for Manufacturers in 2017

Dec 15, 2016

By MFG Talk Radio The manufacturing industry has continued to push through the fourth industrial revolution known as Industry 4.0. Manufacturers are realizing that these new technology trends have become less of an addition and more of a necessity for their business. Digital systems, collaborative robotics and science-fiction sounding technology has become the standard conversion for those in the industry. Some of the technologies that will be discussed have already had an impact throughout 2016 but as we enter a new year, even more manufacturers will start getting on board as they become more advanced. Below we will be diving into 5 trends that will continue to drive manufacturing forward into the new year and beyond. Cybersecurity This is a concept that manufacturers haven’t had to worry about for so long. Industrial businesses were convinced that they would never need to invest into cybersecurity platforms as their business was generally handled in person, over the phone or on the shop floor. However, as manufacturers became more connected over that past couple years to improve operations, they unknowingly opened themselves up to new business risks. Manufacturers are utilizing the Industrial Internet of Things more than ever before in history. The pioneers of this innovative system have laid the foundation for smaller manufacturers to take advantage of what the IIoT has to offer. As more aspects of a manufacturing operation become controlled or monitored by connected digital systems, it leaves doors open for a would be cyber criminal to wreak havoc on a business. Cybersecurity will be absolutely critical in 2017 in order for manufacturers to continue benefiting from all this new technology while also keeping their business and employees safe. More on Cybersecurity and Industrial Manufacturing http://mfgtalkradio.com/ddos-attack-hits-eastern-us-manufacturers-paying-attention/ Advanced Materials Material science continues to advance and manufacturers stand to benefit greatly. Carbon fiber was once thought to be the material on the 21st century. However, Carbon nanotube manufacturing is taking impressive strides forward and no one is certain what the future will hold. Graphene is still on the minds of manufacturers everywhere and it doesn’t end there. New materials are even helping to improve high-tech batteries which could help manufacturers power their business, store energy for...

Stratasys Reveals Large-Part 3D Printing Demonstrator

Stratasys Reveals Large-Part 3D Printing Demonstrator

Nov 7, 2016

Featured in Design-2-Part Magazine MINNEAPOLIS & REHOVOT, Israel—The 3D printing and additive manufacturing company Stratasys is working with Ford and Boeing on new technology to 3D print large aerospace and automotive parts. Demonstrations of the technology, including the Stratasys Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator, were to be previewed at IMTS 2016 as part of the company’s Shaping What’s Next™ vision for manufacturing. In a company release, Stratasys said that its Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator builds on the company’s industrial FDM® 3D printing expertise to respond to the needs of customers’ most challenging applications. The 3D demonstrator is said to address manufacturers’ needs to rapidly produce strong parts ranging in size from an automobile armrest to an entire aircraft interior panel.     The Stratasys Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator is designed to address the requirements of aerospace, automotive, and other industries for large lightweight, thermoplastic parts with repeatable mechanical properties. The Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator offers what the company calls a revolutionary approach to FDM extrusion that increases throughput and repeatability. The system is said to turn the traditional 3D printer concept on its side to realize an “infinite-build” approach that prints on a vertical plane for practically unlimited part size in the build direction. Aerospace giant Boeing played an influential role in defining the requirements and specifications for the demonstrator. Boeing is currently using an Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator to explore the production of low volume, lightweight parts. Ford Motor Company is also exploring innovative automotive manufacturing applications for this demonstrator, and will evaluate this new technology. Ford and Stratasys will work together to test and develop new applications for automotive-grade 3D printed materials that were not previously possible due to limited size, enabling and accelerating innovative automotive product design, Stratasys said. “3D printing holds the promise of changing automotive design and manufacturing because it opens up new ways to innovate and create efficiencies in production,” said Mike Whitens, director of vehicle enterprise sciences at Ford Research & Advanced Engineering, in the release. “Our vision at Ford is to make high-speed, high-quality printing of automotive-grade parts a reality. We are excited about the future opportunities that the scalable and versatile Infinite-Build concept can unlock, and look forward to collaborating with...

Carbon bolsters 3D-printing breakthrough with novel…

Carbon bolsters 3D-printing breakthrough with novel…

Oct 4, 2016

“Carbon bolsters 3D-printing breakthrough with novel business model” By Frank Vinluan, Plastics Today Ford, BMW already on board; medical deemed biggest opportunity in years ahead The 3D-printing technology developed by Carbon (Redwood City, CA) has grabbed the attention of plastic parts manufacturers because it enables printing speeds that are up to 100 times faster than current additive manufacturing methods. Beyond introducing a new technology, CEO Joseph DeSimone believes his company’s innovation could open the door to new business models by offering manufacturers unprecedented efficiencies and savings. The company calls its technology continuous liquid interface production, or CLIP. DeSimone has a simpler way of describing it, explaining that the Carbon process uses light and oxygen to shape a part as it emerges from a pool of resin. The company says this approach to 3D printing permits a faster, continuous process that produces parts matching the quality of injection-molded plastics. “With light as a chisel, we are able to manufacture parts that previously weren’t manufacturable,” DeSimone said, speaking recently at the CED TechVenture conference in Raleigh, NC. Right now, companies currently keep billions of dollars worth of parts in inventory, DeSimone said. Even when parts are ordered in a “just-in-time” manner, the supply chain still needs time to deliver inventory to a site. Current 3D-printing technology is too slow to be used for more than prototyping parts, he added. But the capability to print parts on demand at high speed makes 3D manufacturing possible, and that has significant ramifications for the supply chain. Carbon believes that its 3D-printing technology will enable manufacturers to make parts only as they are needed, reducing cost and the need to stock inventory. Carbon launched its 3D printer, called the M1, in April, as PlasticsToday reported. DeSimone’s keynote in North Carolina offered an update on the company’s progress; notably, he told the audience that he envisioned multiple Carbon manufacturing sites for the M1 beyond the company’s Silicon Valley headquarters. His talk turned out to be a preview of the company’s big news: $81 million in new corporate and venture investment to ramp up production of the M1 to meet expected demand. The latest investments bring Carbon’s total funding haul to $222...

Stratasys launches two new 3D printers, partners with Boeing…

Stratasys launches two new 3D printers, partners with Boeing…

Sep 21, 2016

“Stratasys launches two new 3D printers, partners with Boeing and Ford on applications” By Alison DeNisco, TechRepublic Two new 3D printers from Stratasys could revolutionize aerospace and automobile manufacturing, the company announced Wednesday. The machines represent the next step in large-scale 3D printing for manufacturing, which experts say will completely change the field in the next decade. The Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator and the Robotic Composite 3D Demonstrator expand the company’s Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technology across manufacturing to more efficiently build bigger, stronger, higher-quality parts. Stratasys also partnered with Boeing to define the requirements and specifications for the Infinite-Build to meet their needs for customized flight parts. Ford Motor Company is also exploring the machine’s abilities for car manufacturing, Stratasys announced. Both the aerospace and automobile industries face pressure to continue to innovate and evolve—not only in performance, but in time to market, said Scott Sevcik, director of manufacturing platform development at Stratasys. Industry leaders are considering how to gain a competitive edge by offering a more differentiated passenger experience, whether in flight or on the road. “These industries are looking strongly toward 3D printing as a critical enabler to meet those needs going forward,” Sevcik said. “It offers the freedom of design, to be able to create parts that you could not make before with traditional processes.” The new machines further Stratasys’ efforts in large-scale manufacturing with 3D printing. In June, the company announced a partnership with Toyota division Daihatsu, offering 10 different 3D printed designs and patterns that owners can customize for the Copen two-door convertible. While 3D printing has been used on a small scale for race car parts in the past, these projects represent the industry’s first move into more mainstream auto manufacturing. Rise of 3D printing manufacturing The adoption of industrial 3D printing continues to grow, with global spending on printers reaching nearly $11 billion in 2015. Spending is predicted to rise to about $27 billion by 2019, according toInternational Data Corporation. About two-thirds of US manufacturers are currently adopting 3D printing in some way, an April PricewaterhouseCoopers report found—roughly the same number as did in 2014. However, 51% are using it for prototyping and final products, compared to...