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LG Electronics Building New Manufacturing Plant In Tennessee

LG Electronics Building New Manufacturing Plant In Tennessee

Mar 2, 2017

By Business Facilities The home appliance manufacturer will invest $250 million, create 600 new jobs in Clarksville, TN at its first U.S. washing machine manufacturing operation. After a lengthy site selection process that considered eight states, LG Electronics Inc. has decided to build its first washing machine manufacturing operation in the United States in Clarksville, TN. The South Korean manufacturer of appliances, electronics and mobile devices will invest $250 million in the facility, creating at least 600 new jobs in Montgomery County. “LG is proud to make further investments in America, to create jobs and to bring state-of-the-art home appliance production technology to the great state of Tennessee,” said Dan Song, president of the LG Home Appliance and Air Solutions Company. “Over the past six years, LG studied eight states for the location of this facility. Tennessee is the clear choice for LG’s latest major investment in America, due to the state’s excellent business climate, quality workforce and central location for distribution to our U.S. customers.” LG’s new Tennessee facility is expected to be the world’s most advanced production plant for washing machines. Construction on the 829,000-square-foot facility will begin later this year. Starting in 2019, the factory will initially  produce front- and top-load washing machines. Longer term, the 310-acre site offers the potential to expand for production of other home appliances. “We are proud to welcome LG to Tennessee and thank the company for creating 600 valuable, new jobs in Clarksville,” said Gov. Bill Haslam. “LG’s decision to establish new manufacturing operations in Tennessee is a testament to the business-friendly environment, ideal location and highly-skilled workforce we offer to companies around the globe. Tennessee is the top state in the nation for advanced industry job growth, an accomplishment that would not be possible without the many successful companies that choose to do business here. I look forward to building a lasting partnership with LG in the years ahead as we work together to make Tennessee the No. 1 location in the Southeast for high quality jobs.” Tennessee was ranked No. 1 among all U.S. states for foreign direct investment (FDI) job commitments in 2015, according to the 2016 IBM Global Locations Trends report. South Korea is among the top...

US manufacturing surges to a 3-year high in February

US manufacturing surges to a 3-year high in February

Mar 1, 2017

By Akin Oyedele, Business Insider US manufacturing expanded more than expected in February, according to the Institute of Supply Management.  The monthly purchasing manager’s index jumped to 57.7, the highest since December 2014 and more than economists’ forecast for 56.2.  According to ISM, orders rose at the fastest pace since February 2013.  Earlier regional manufacturing surveys, including those from Philadelphia and New York, had also pointed to an overall improvement in the sector. “Growth is being driven by robust domestic demand, stemming in turn from buoyant consumers and increased investment spending by the energy sector in particular,” said Chris Williamson, the chief business economist at IHS Markit.  Markit Economics’ monthly PMI was 54.2, lower than economists’ forecast for 54.5 according to Bloomberg.  “Manufacturing is far from booming, however, as the strong dollar means near-stagnant exports continue to act as a drag on growth,” he added....

Here are the cities where manufacturing hiring is strongest

Here are the cities where manufacturing hiring is strongest

Feb 27, 2017

By Craig M. Douglas and Joe Martin, Houston Business Journal The manufacturing industry made headlines recently following a Feb. 23 meeting between President Donald Trump and some of the country’s largest manufacturing CEOs. Whether any policy changes will emerge from the discussion remains to be seen, but the best strategy — in terms of fostering growth throughout the U.S. manufacturing sector — may be simply to do nothing. That’s because U.S. manufacturing jobs have been on the increase for the better part of five years. Manufacturing jobs declined by around 1 million positions throughout the nation’s 107 largest metros between 2006 and 2016, with some areas losing more than a quarter of their workforces. Meanwhile, between 2011 and 2016, those same 107 areas saw a 4 percent increase in manufacturing hiring. The uptick equated to a net increase of roughly 280,000 jobs, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Houston saw a slightly different trajectory. Between 2006 and 2016, the Houston area added 5,600 manufacturing jobs, however, between 2011 and 2016 Houston saw a net decrease of 900 jobs as the energy industry went through a downturn, according to the data. Two-thirds of Houston’s manufacturing jobs are related to durable goods, or items with a useful life of three or more years, including oil field equipment, steel and computers, according to the Greater Houston Partnership. And while Houston saw a slight decrease between 2011 and 2016 — an atypical trend for the 107 cities surveyed — the GHP says the manufacturing sector is expected to increase in 2017.   The gains reported between 2011 and 2016 were spread throughout the country. Top among all metros was Louisville, Kentucky, where makers of everything from cars to guns to bourbon boosted hiring by 27.2 percent. Further south in Nashville, Tennessee, hiring spiked 27 percent, while in the Daytona Beach area of Florida it increased by 25.3 percent. In terms of actual jobs created, Detroit reported the biggest gains with some 37,500 new manufacturing jobs added between 2011 and 2016. Nearby, Grand Rapids, Michigan, ranked second, with a net of 21,000 new jobs, while Nashville was third at 18,300, according to the BLS data. The nation’s three-largest cities...

Factory moves from China to U.S. with help from robot…

Factory moves from China to U.S. with help from robot…

Feb 23, 2017

  “Factory moves from China to U.S. with help from robot workforce”   Automation has contributed to the declining U.S. manufacturing workforce. But as Mark Strassmann reports, now technology may help factories move back to the U.S.  ...

Walmart commits $250 billion to American-made goods

Walmart commits $250 billion to American-made goods

Feb 21, 2017

By Rich Rovito, Biz Times In 2013, Walmart, the world’s largest retailer, made a bold commitment to purchase an additional $250 billion in products supporting American jobs over 10 years. Based on data from Boston Consulting Group, it’s estimated that one million new U.S. jobs could be created through this initiative, including direct manufacturing job growth of approximately 250,000 and indirect job growth of approximately 750,000 in the support and service sector.  “We are fully invested in this work because it is good for everyone involved. It both allows us to give our customers the products they want at a better price, and it positions us to help our suppliers move jobs back to the United States,” said Joe Quinn, senior director of public affairs and government relations for Walmart. “Our core customer makes it clear that, when possible, families want to buy products that are made in this country.  And by making this work a priority we are increasing overall awareness of why it matters so much to communities.” Quinn will provide an update on the initiative during a break-out session at the Wisconsin Manufacturing Extension Partnership’s Manufacturing Matters! conference on Feb. 23 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Milwaukee. He will also offer a look at the retailer’s work with both large and small manufacturers in the effort to bring production and jobs back to the United States. Sourcing more products domestically has also allowed Walmart to lower its transportation costs and be quicker to react to consumer demand, he added. “As consumers tastes or desires change, the closer you are to your source of production the quicker you can change,” Quinn said. Walmart spends $4.4 billion annually with suppliers in Wisconsin and supports 68,000 supplier jobs in the state, according to the company. “Wisconsin is a state with a great work ethic and a long history of understanding manufacturing,” Quinn said. He noted that one of Walmart’s major Wisconsin suppliers is Kimberly-Clark Corp., which produces paper-based consumer products, including diapers, toilet paper and facial tissue, at its manufacturing complex in Neenah. Feedback from consumers has shown support for Walmart’s program, with research showing that where a product is made is second...

$64 Million Digital Factory Is Said to Herald the…

$64 Million Digital Factory Is Said to Herald the…

Feb 20, 2017

“$64 Million Digital Factory Is Said to Herald the Future of Manufacturing” By Design-2-Part Magazine Faurecia’s Columbus, Indiana-based emissions control technologies plant represents company’s digital transformation. AUBURN HILLS, Mich.—The automotive supplier Faurecia recently unveiled a $64 million state-of-the-art, data-driven manufacturing facility in Columbus, Indiana, that  will employ 450 people. Columbus South, a 400,000 square-foot facility, will produce a new, high-tech emissions control product for the commercial vehicle industry. “This facility represents our entry into Industry 4.0, a revolutionary concept incorporating connectivity, automation, data processing, and hardware to advance the manufacturing industry,” said Mike Galarno, plant manager of Columbus South, in a press release. “We are proud to be the first plant to incorporate many of these leading technologies under one roof to create efficient systems and an innovative working experience for employees.” With this facility, Faurecia is driving forward the company’s digital transformation by ushering in technologies that are at the forefront of modern-day manufacturing. “Manufacturing is sometimes stereotyped as dirty and requiring few skills,” said Dave DeGraaf, president of Faurecia Emissions Control Technologies North America, in the release. “Columbus South contributes to the shifting landscape of the industry to one that is modern, clean, and technologically advanced, and aimed at attracting a new generation of employees with different and advanced skillsets.” The Columbus South facility’s digital environment will feature a variety of new technologies, systems, and processes that reflect the improvements of Industry 4.0, including quality through laser scanning and early detection of variation; self-learning autonomous intelligent vehicles (AIVs) to transport component parts to the assembly line; continuous data collection, which enables employees to predict and prevent equipment failures; a completely paperless environment that keeps employees connected and informed with real time information; and an open-concept design and digital screens, laptops, and smartphones to encourage collaboration. In addition to these advancements, Columbus South will also have a combination of collaborative robots, or “cobots,” automated robotic vehicles, and visual communication techniques designed to foster real-time collaboration and communication. Collectively, Columbus South is expected to analyze terabytes of data daily, requiring a full-time, on-site mathematician to continually mine data, cull insights, and forecast an issue before it occurs. “Columbus South isn’t only about the product...