Spotlight on advances in additive manufacturing in…

Spotlight on advances in additive manufacturing in…

Jun 26, 2018

“Spotlight on advances in additive manufacturing in aerospace & defense” By Dr Bryony Core and Dr Richard Collins, 3D Printing Progress In IDTechEx Research’s latest report Additive Manufacturing and Lightweight Materials for Aerospace and Defense 2018-2028, the focus is on advanced lightweight materials and the rise of additive manufacturing. The material outlook is for all aerospace and defense applications; aircraft have the highest demand by volume and the applications investigated ranges to structural load-bearing roles, interiors, jet engines, and more. This report tackles the key lightweight materials, targeting those most relevant to the aerospace and defense sector including: composites (FRP, CMC, MMC), lightweight metals (Al, Ti, Mg), and other emerging materials (specifically polymer aerogels and CNT yarns). IDTechEx Research forecasts the key additive manufacturing technologies used by the aerospace and defense sector, with in depth discussion of currently commercialised and emerging printer technologies. The current state of the printer market is analysed, and long-range forecasts from 2018-2023 for accumulated and annual sales of printer technologies and materials including metal powders are evaluated. Key technological capabilities, aerospace and defense manufacturing readiness levels, SWOT analyses and key manufacturers are discussed for each established printer type. As a key early adopter of additive manufacturing, organizations serving the aerospace and defense industry continually make the headlines as they push the boundaries of what is currently possible with additive manufacturing. IDTechEx presents a tech round-up of the latest innovations from GE Additive, Boeing and the US Airforce. Find out more about how additive manufacturing and lightweighting technologies are shaping design and manufacture in aerospace and defense with Additive Manufacturing and Lightweight Materials for Aerospace and Defense 2018-2028. GE Additive builds pipeline of future talent GE Additive is taking steps to ensure that the next generation of engineers is well equipped to capitalize on the opportunities and meet the challenges presented by AM as part of its five-year Education Program investment program. GE donated eight Concept Laser MLAB cusing R DMLM printers to worth $250,000 each to universities around the globe, including Ohio State University and the U.S. Naval Academy. At the time of the program’s launch, Mohammad Ehteshami, VP of GE Additive stated that “Additive Manufacturing is revolutionising the...

Desktop 3D Printer Offers Speed, Precision, Ability to Work in…

Desktop 3D Printer Offers Speed, Precision, Ability to Work in…

Jun 18, 2018

“Desktop 3D Printer Offers Speed, Precision, Ability to Work in Metal” Featured on D2PMagazine.com Airwolf 3D calls its newly released EVO a rugged ‘additive manufacturing center’ that is powered by an automotive-grade microcontroller FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif.—Airwolf 3D recently released EVO, its 5th generation 3D printer that is said to be so advanced that Airwolf calls it a desktop “Additive Manufacturing Center,” or AMC. “The EVO is completely new and it’s unlike anything out there,” said Airwolf 3D Co-Founder and CEO Erick Wolf, in a company release. “We took the technology that we perfected with our prosumer line of 3D printers and leveraged it to develop a machine that’s light years beyond anything else on the market. The EVO is faster, stronger, and more accurate than any desktop 3D printer—it delivers a premium 3D manufacturing experience at less than half the cost of machines that offer equivalent performance. Plus, it’s packed with new technology that dramatically changes the way we manufacture, including the ability to work in metals. The EVO far surpasses the capabilities of a traditional desktop 3D printer. It’s a true desktop Additive Manufacturing Center.” The EVO possesses Airwolf 3D’s signature suite of features—auto-leveling, large build size, high-temperature multi-material printing, and compatibility with water-soluble Hydrofill support material—but in an ultra-ruggedized unit that includes cutting-edge features available only from Airwolf 3D. Most notable among these is the industry-first PartSave™. Nicknamed “Zombie Mode,” PartSave solves one of the most frustrating problems with 3D printing. There are few things more disheartening than 3D printing a part for hours, only to have it fail completely if the printer stops because of a power outage or unplugging the machine. With PartSave, once power is restored, the machine resumes where it left off, enabling the part to finish. Another industry-first feature, the company said, is FailSafe™. If you run out of filament or experience a jam, FailSafe™ has you covered. Just place the print head at the height you left off and FailSafe will do the rest, restoring your print and completing the job with time to spare, according to Airwolf. The EVO also ships with a full-color 7–inch Matrix touchscreen display, new Tri-Heat™ Enclosed Build Environment, an oversized...

171,000 Jobs Come Home to USA in 2017

171,000 Jobs Come Home to USA in 2017

Jun 4, 2018

By Frank Spotorno with Dan Murphy, Yonkers Times A recent report by our friends at The Reshoring Initiative (reshorenow.org) found that last year, 2017, the USA saw an increase in manufacturing jobs coming back to this country, or reshoring, at a record pace: 171,000 jobs have returned as a result of reshoring or foreign investment. American companies are shifting their production of goods from outside the U.S. and bringing their jobs home. While the 171,000 jobs that returned last year is significant, projected figures from this year show that the trend toward making it in the USA is continuing. While some of the reasons for the return of manufacturing jobs to the USA can be attributed to President Donald Trump and his “Buy American, Hire American” initiative, other factors that add to the bottom line of U.S. companies include proximity to customers, government incentives, and the value of “Made in the USA” branding. Harry Mosher, president of the Reshoring Initiative, said that more jobs will continue to come back to the USA. “With 3 million to 4 million manufacturing jobs still offshore, as measured by our $500 billion-per-year trade deficit, there is potential for much more growth,” he said. “We call on the administration and Congress to enact policy changes to make the United States competitive again.” Mosher added that a strong dollar and a stronger skilled U.S. workforce helps continue the wave of jobs coming back home. The Reshoring Initiative has been calculating the cost of doing business for American companies overseas, and comparing it to making it in the USA for more than a decade. Every year the cost of building goods and products in China, in comparison to the USA, has narrowed and is now at the point where it makes real business sense to return manufacturing plants back to America. “We know where the imports are by country, and we know the price difference between the foreign price and the U.S price,” said Mosher. “The total cost of foreign-made goods delivered to the U.S. is a full 95 percent of the cost of U.S.-produced goods. We know how much you have to shift it to make the U.S. competitive with China.”...

Smart manufacturing technology is changing business…

Smart manufacturing technology is changing business…

May 30, 2018

“Smart manufacturing technology is changing business processes” By Jim O’Donnell, TechTarget The future is here: AI enablement and smart manufacturing technologies are transforming business systems today, according to technology futurist Jack Shaw. Imagine a scenario where a plane in midflight from Paris to Boston gets a signal from an embedded sensor in an engine fuel nozzle that indicates excessive wear. Once the plane lands, it will need to be taken out of service for hours or even days as the airline locates and installs a replacement part. The entire process is time-consuming, expensive and inconvenient for passengers and crews. But thanks to smart manufacturing technology and AI-enabled business processes and systems, there is a better way, according to technology futurist and consultant Jack Shaw. The digital transformation to an AI-enabled business ecosystem is happening now, Shaw said in a presentation at the Smart Manufacturing Experience conference this month in Boston. An autonomous self-contained process Rather than the current costly and time-consuming process, the smart manufacturing technology ecosystem encompasses a self-contained and autonomous parts replacement process. To start the process, industrial IoT (IIoT) smart sensor circuitry in the engine’s nozzle triggers the aircraft’s autonomous maintenance system, which then messages the airline’s global maintenance system that the part will be needed when the plane lands in Boston, Shaw said. The airline’s global procurement system is notified. It scours thousands of websites to identify Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)-certified parts suppliers, negotiates the terms with the supplier’s AI-enabled order management system and executes a smart contract to procure the part. Once the procurement contract is authorized, a design file of the fuel nozzle part is downloaded to a 3D printer located near the Boston airport. The entire process — from the identification of a part defect to the design download to the 3D printer — takes less than four minutes and requires no human intervention, according to Shaw. But the smart manufacturing technology and AI-enabled ecosystem is not finished. Automatic procurement processes identify and select technical engineers who are experienced with replacing this particular part and available to do the work. The technical engineer who installs the part then uses augmented reality (AR) goggles that display a 3D video of the entire replacement process directly on...

Direct Metal Printing Is Key to Bringing First-of-its-Kind…

Direct Metal Printing Is Key to Bringing First-of-its-Kind…

May 24, 2018

“Direct Metal Printing Is Key to Bringing First-of-its-Kind Faucet to Market” Featured on D2PMagazine.com ROCK HILL, S.C.—Kallista, a designer and provider of luxury kitchen and bath products, unveiled its Grid™ sink faucet at KBIS 2018 earlier this year. 3D Systems’ Direct Metal Printing technology was instrumental in bringing the first-of-its-kind sink faucet—produced by 3rd Dimension using 3D Systems’ 3D printing materials and technology—to market. According to a release from 3D Systems (www.3dsystems.com), its technologies enabled Kallista to “design without limitations” in its efforts to bring the product to market. Kallista’s design team embarked on a journey to create a faucet in a unique geometry. In deciding to produce the spout via 3D printing, the designers were able to design without limitations to create an open form and discrete interior channels that allow water to flow easily through the base. “Designers usually need to consider a manufacturing process, and they have to design around that process,” said Bill McKeone, design studio manager at Kallista, in a statement. ”By choosing to produce this faucet via 3D printing, we opened ourselves to limitless design possibilities. 3D Systems’ breadth of materials and technologies allowed us the freedom to create a unique, functional faucet which would not have been possible with a traditional manufacturing process.” The faucets were produced by metal 3D printing specialist, 3rd Dimension, a production metal manufacturer specializing in 3D direct metal printing based in Indianapolis. 3rd Dimension (print3d4u.com) employed 3D Systems’ ProX® DMP 320 high-performance metal additive manufacturing system. To avoid rust and corrosion, the faucets are printed with 3D Systems’ LaserForm® 316L, a high quality stainless steel 316 powder material. “In order to realize the best product, you have to start with the best tools,” said Bob Markley, president, 3rd Dimension, in the release. “The strength of the 3D Systems technology and materials, coupled with the expertise of our engineers and machinists, allowed us to rapidly produce and deliver these high end faucets for Kallista.” As this was the first additively manufactured product for Kallista, the team at 3rd Dimension led them through a program to develop the as-designed concept for the 3D printing process. Developing the design for additive manufacturing meant that Kallista was able to avoid the...

How Factory Intelligence is Evolving

How Factory Intelligence is Evolving

May 23, 2018

By Larry Maggiano, Senior Systems Analyst, Mitutoyo America Corp. Featured on AdvancedManufacturing.org Intelligent factories have existed since manufacturing’s historical inception, but intelligence—defined as the acquisition and application of manufacturing knowledge—resided only with the factory’s staff. With the advent of numerical control (NC) and then computer numerical control (CNC) technologies, factory machines gained digital I/O capabilities but were still not smart. Digitally enabled machines, though increasingly productive, had no awareness of themselves, their environment, or the tasks being performed or to-be performed. In spite of these limitations, centralized factory intelligence has been achieved at modest scales through a deterministic low-level set of digital commands and responses. An experiment in large-scale centralized factory intelligence was General Motor’s 1982 Manufacturing Automation Protocol (MAP), operating over token bus network protocol (IEE 802.4). The MAP-enabled factory intelligence experiment ended in 2004 as it was difficult to maintain operational reliability. One of the most important reasons was a lack of system resiliency, a downside of required deterministic factory communication standards and protocols. Another reason was that the connected machines could not continue to operate at any level when instructions were not forthcoming from a central system. An analogy might be made to the mainframe-to-terminal infrastructure that became obsolete in the 1990s with the development of the PC and distributed computing. Several significant changes have enabled the development of smart machines for the intelligent factory. The first is the extension of IT’s ubiquitous Ethernet LAN infrastructure to the shop floor, enabling rapid 3D downloads of model-based definition (MBD), and uploads of process and product data. Secondly, today’s digital twins are smart in that they possess an awareness of not only their capabilities and operational status, but of work that can be performed on any particular MBD. In this manner, smart machines can bid on tasks, much like their human partners. A smart machine’s digital twin does not need deterministic low-level instructions, but instead responds to a submitted MBD, and, if selected, does real work with its physical counterpart. Lastly, three standardized core technologies–HTML, CSS and JavaScript—are recognized as enabling the widespread adoption of the Internet and the emergence of intelligent global systems. It is envisioned that similar standardized core technologies will enable...